Its 2016: what case can be made for the Government to be in the broadcasting business, competing unfairly with the private sector? The CBC receives advertising and cable/satellite fees-fees greater than CTV and Global but this is not enough for the greedy CBC who also receive more than a billion dollars of your tax money. And now the new Trudeau Government has promised at least an additional $150 million dollars a year to this biased, wasteful government broadcaster. As is, Taxpayers continue to be hosed to the tune of about $100,000,000 (yes, 100 MILLION) of our taxes every 30 days with no CBC accountability to taxpayers as they continue with their biased news service serving only the extreme socialists and anti-Semitics. Wake up Canada!

cbcExposed continues to hear from confidential sources inside the CBC about the "scandal du jour" and we will continue to expose their reports of waste, abuse and bias while we protect our sources. We take joy in knowing CBC-HQ visits us daily to research our stories such as the CBC Sunshine List, ongoing scandals including the epic Dr. Leenen case against The Fifth Estate (the largest libel case ever awarded against the media in Canadian history) where no one at CBC was fired and taxpayers paid the award and legal costs for this CBC Libel action. Writers and filmmakers take note-this is a Perfect story for a Documentary!

cbcExposed continues to enjoy substantial visitors coming from Universities and Colleges across Canada who use us for research in debates, exams, etc. We ask students to please join us in this mission; you have the power to make a difference! And so can private broadcasters who we know are hurting from the dwindling Advertising revenue pool and the CBC taking money from that pool while also unfairly getting Tax subsidies money. It's time to stop being silent and start speaking up.

Our cbcExposed Twitter followers and frequent visitors to cbcExposed continue to motivate us to expose CBC’s abuse and waste of tax money as well as exposing their ongoing left wing bully-like news bias. Polls meanwhile show that Canadians favour selling the wasteful government owned media giant and to put our tax money to better use for all Canadians. The Liberals privatized Petro Canada and Air Canada; it’s time for the Trudeau Liberals to privatize the CBC, not give them more tax money.

What does it take for real change at the CBC? You! Our blog now contains a link to the Politicians contact info for you to make your voice heard. Act now and contact your MP, the Cabinet and Prime Minister ... tell them to stop wasting your money, and ... sell the CBC.

Monday, October 24, 2016

CBC employees overpaid and have questionable performance

News media is undergoing a rapid and beautiful process of creative destruction: digitalization means vastly lower costs, fewer barriers to entry, and a wider variety of competing options for consumers to enjoy. Amid this innovation and weeding out stands the too-big-to-fail albatross, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Already costing taxpayers $1.04 billion in 2015 and facing rising competition, the CBC's fiscal burden is set to jump by $75 million in 2016 and $150 million in 2017. Regarding the higher price tag of the state broadcaster, Finance Minister Bill Morneau has deflected by saying that “believing in innovation is also believing in the talent and in the creativity of Canadians.” Apologists further contend this is necessary to save the CBC from "extinction."

That begs the question: if the CBC is growing obsolete and people favour other sources, ones that do not cost the taxpayer, how is that a bad thing?

The truth is that the CBC has become a gravy train for elites, with the backing of government unions. These elites have managed to persuade people that they are desperate and hard done by, while the average salary at the broadcaster is $100,528 per year. That is well into the top 10 per cent of all Canadian earners and 23 per cent more than the average earnings of a private-sector TV employee, even before the CBC's luxurious benefits.

Not only are CBC employees overpaid, their performance has been questionable.

While full privatization of the CBC would be ideal, legislators would do well to at least stop the bleeding. That would mean reining in the network to its limited mandate of radio and television, and not bowing to requests for more funding until that is realized.

Read the full story here.

Friday, October 21, 2016

CBC under attack - accused of being uber predator

The CBC came under attack Thursday by executives from legacy and new media, as a panel of MPs looking at how to address the crisis of dwindling revenues in the local news business held its latest meeting.

John Honderich, chair of Torstar Corp., pulled no punches, telling the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage “there is a crisis of declining good journalism across Canada and at this point we only see the situation getting worse.”

Honderich said The Toronto Star, his company’s flagship publication, will have 170 journalists in its newsroom at the end of this year, down from 470 ten years ago. He noted as an example careers advertising, which once brought in $75 million in revenue each year for the company, and now no longer exists as a revenue stream because of free online portals.

“While the CBC has done many wonderful things, it is important you know that, from my vantage point, it is not some wonderful, benevolent entity,” iPolitics publisher James Baxter told the panel of MPs. “It’s an uber-predator.”

“Because of the nature of its web content, the CBC is not competing with Huffington Post and CNN, but instead crushes the Globe and Mail, Postmedia and, yes, iPolitics.”

Read the full story here.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

CBC complaint quashed by Competition Bureau

The Competition Bureau has rejected a CBC complaint about an Olympic television partnership forged by Bell Globemedia and Rogers Communications.

In a news release yesterday, the bureau said the alliance, which plans to bid for the rights to the 2010 Vancouver Olympics and 2012 Olympic Games, does not violate the Competition Act.

"The bureau carefully examined the allegations and found no evidence to suggest that a Bell Globemedia-Rogers partnership would impair the CBC/Radio-Canada's ability to compete for the broadcasting rights," the bureau said.

The CBC filed its complaint in August after a Globe and Mail report revealed Globemedia and Rogers were planning to team up to bid for the television rights to the two Olympics.

The CBC argued that the alliance cornered the market on the two major sports networks -- TSN, owned by Globemedia, and Sportsnet, owned by Rogers. The CBC said the partnership denied it a major Olympic sports cable partner.

The CBC also said the Globemedia-Rogers deal raised issues under the abuse of dominance, mergers and criminal provisions of the act.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Why Was CBC Peter Mansbridge Permitted to Support the Mother Canada Project?

"I decided that you can't cover a controversy by being in one."

That's Peter Mansbridge's revelatory explanation as to why his name no longer appears -- after many months -- as an Honourary Patron of the controversial Never Forgotten war memorial proposed for Cape Breton Island.

Apart from the fact that this is one of the basic tenets of journalism -- along with get your facts right, and don't misspell someone's name -- it avoids answering the really important question in this whole fiasco.

What were CBC executives thinking when they gave Mansbridge permission to become an Honourary Patron of the Mother Canada project?

The very idea breaks CBC's very clear rules on preserving journalistic impartiality.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

CBC Bungles Upcoming Rollout of Opinion Section

If anyone still thought CBC’s decision to launch an “Opinion site” next month was a good idea, an op-ed published by the CBC today should set her/him sober.

The hit piece—and yes, I’m aware this response is a hit piece as well, but at least it is published on my own independent blog, not paid for by taxpayers—entitled “Canadian Taxpayers Federation has 5 members—why should we care what they think?” was written by Dougald Lamont, a senior policy advisor for Liberal MP Robert-Falcon Ouellette.

Beginning the comedy of errors in this article’s encapsulation of why the CBC should not be in the business of telling us what to think, the public (de facto state propaganda) broadcaster described the Liberal MP’s staffer as “a lecturer in government and business relations at the University of Winnipeg and a long-time Liberal working in policy and communications.” This vague bio fails to disclose that Lamont works for a Liberal MP. CBC simply stating he is a “long-time Liberal working in policy and communications” does not suffice. Why not be crystal clear and put “former campaign director of communications and now senior policy advisor for Liberal MP Robert-Falcon Ouellette”?

Read the full article here.

Monday, October 17, 2016

Quebec Broadcasters Take Aim At CBC

CBC accused of using government funds to 'outpace' private counterparts.

A group of Quebec broadcasters has fired back at CBC/Radio-Canada president and CEO Hubert Lacroix over remarks made during an appearance at the University of British Columbia on Tuesday.

Groupe Serdy president and CEO Sébastien Arsenault, Groupe V Média president and CEO Maxime Rémillard, and TVA Group president and CEO Julie Tremblay released a joint statement Wednesday saying Lacroix had mischaracterized their position as a desire to keep the public broadcaster locked into the “status quo.”

The executives said they are actually advocating for a “thorough review” of CBC/Radio-Canada’s mandate as part of the review of Canada’s broadcast system announced by the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

The statement argued that if there is “no accountability” for an additional $675 million in government funding CBC/Radio-Canada is slated to receive, the “already precarious balance” between the public broadcaster and the rest of the industry “will be destroyed.”

The executives expressed concern the funding could amount to a “blank cheque” for CBC/Radio-Canada to step up its “already ferocious competition” against private broadcasters.

Read the full story here.

Friday, October 14, 2016

CBC being sued by gay Iranian refugee

A gay Iranian refugee living in Vancouver is suing the CBC, along with former CBC journalists Evan Solomon and Farid Haerinejad claiming they outed him in a documentary.

He claims the film Out in Iran: Inside Iran’s Secret Gay World ruined his life.

The 2007 documentary looks at the struggle for human rights of gay activists in Iran, and the climate of fear and violence perpetrated by the state.

The suit centres around a sequence filmed with a hidden camera in a Tehran food court in 2006 that was a hang out for gays and transgender people.

In the documentary, presenter Solomon can be heard stating “We keep our camera hidden, but Mani (a character in the film) has told the crowd that we’re there to film, and there’s group consent.”

On camera after the documentary finishes, Solomon says “And about the people you saw in that item, all of them agreed to show their faces on camera, fully aware of the potential consequences”

Farzam Dadashzadeh, who claims he appears in the film, denies both.

Farzam claims the content of the film, which includes images of homosexuals who had been lashed or hung by authorites, proves its makers were well aware of the consequences for Iranian gays. He alleges they put his life in danger by failing to get his consent.

The CBC say it’s aware of the suit, and considering its next steps.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Another lawsuit at CBC for wrongful dismissal

Canadian Broadcasting Corp. fired a senior human resources manager who was in psychological crisis brought about by the “toxic work environment” at the national broadcaster, according to her lawsuit for wrongful dismissal.

Days before she was dismissed last month, allegedly without cause or reasonable notice, Julia Evans, 37, was “experiencing severe bouts of stress, anxiety and depression as a direct result of a toxic work environment engendered by (the CBC).”

Five days after her termination, her doctor said she was “unfit to work” and “instructed her to remain off work as a result of her illness,” according to her statement of claim filed in Ontario Superior Court. She “remains under constant medical care.”

The lawsuit is the third major legal action for wrongful dismissal in the fallout from the Jian Ghomeshi affair and the independent inquiry into bullying and harassment at the CBC.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

CBC 1 Billion Subsidy Gives Unfair Advertising Advantage

Last month, the CBC announced that it has hired talented columnist Robyn Urback away from the National Post to set up an online “opinion vertical,” which sounds like a clearing house for hot takes.

The CBC is a creature of the Broadcasting Act, which was last updated in 1991, the same year the World Wide Web was created. In a strict reading of the act, the CBC has no business setting up an online hot-take factory, any more than it has the mandate to set up a national chain of poutine restaurants.

But MPs have not done their jobs and updated the act, and the previous government pushed the CBC to generate more of its own revenue. So managers have wandered into the internet with their gimlet eyes fixed on acquiring clicks.

In the YouTube era, fewer people are settling in to watch Peter Mansbridge deliver the news every night, and the corporation has to make itself relevent to Canadians if it wants to generate revenue and maintain public support.

So the CBC is offering clickbait.

Unlike the BBC, it sells ads on the internet and is moving aggressively to create web-only content, including opinion columns. The CBC tells me it will pay union scale — 55 cents a word — which will immediately make it a very desirable market for opinion typists.

For those of us trying to make our livings in the independent news business, this is worrying. It may be difficult to compete for ad sales and journalism talent with a news organization funded by taxpayers.

There has been a massive migration of advertising to Google and Facebook and a huge influx of venture capital to unsustainable digital startups, leading to an increasingly desperate struggle for a rapidly diminishing pool of advertising.

None of that is the CBC’s fault, but it’s a big player in that battle for ads, making it harder for newspapers to find a working revenue model.

Want to sell ads or hire a columnist? CBC can outbid you. Want to erect a paywall? Why should readers pay for your product if they can get free stories from the CBC?

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

History of CBC intimidation

Cheryl Eckstein senior, chief executive officer of the newly founded Compassionate Healthcare Network (CHN), has just learned how difficult it is to get out a pro-life message in the face of media opposition.

During a presentation on euthanasia to a parliamentary sub-committee in Ottawa last November, Mrs. Eckstein showed a brief clip from a CBC Fifth Estate programme. Her video clip was a portion of the German pre-war propaganda movie, I accuse, which she chose because of its direct application to the Sue Rodriguez case.

Ten days later, Mrs. Eckstein received a phone call from Kelly Crichton, executive producer at the Fifth Estate, who told her that she had not asked for permission to use the clip and that she had misrepresented the point of the documentary.

“She was contentious, and spoke very fast,” Mrs. Eckstein recalls. “I was to the point of tears when she told me that their lawyers would be contacting me.”

Although Mrs. Eckstein tried to explain to Ms. Crichton why she used the clip, she found that “Crichton was not interested in listening to me. She seemed determined to go on with her verbal battering, insisted that the matter was in the hands of their attorneys.”

In the Ottawa Sun, Peter Stockland wrote that Kelly Crichton “said she only wanted to impress on Eckstein that CBC does not permit ‘unauthorized’ use of its programs, and has a strict policy against their use for political purposes.”

On December 4, Liberal MP Don Boudria rose in the House of Commons to speak as a matter of privilege. Mr. Boudria contended that Kelly Crichton’s call to Cheryl Eckstein has breached the privileges of MPs who have the right to listen to any witness “without intimidation of anyone else.”

The implication of the phone call, Mr. Boudria said, was that the CBC was threatening to sue Mrs. Eckstein.

Read the full story here.

Friday, October 07, 2016

CBC Hubert Lacroix’s answer stuns Conservative senator

Senators said they were stunned to hear the head of CBC justify the earnings of one of the broadcaster’s top executives based on the fact that she is a woman.

After questioning Hubert Lacroix about anchor Amanda Lang’s conflict of interest issues during a Senate communications committee hearing Tuesday, Conservative senator Don Plett asked about another CBC employee who may be in conflict of interest at work – Maryse Bertrand.

Plett said he read that Bertrand, who is the vice president of real estate services and legal services general counsel for the CBC, is also a director of Metro Richelieu as well as on the board of National Bank.

From Metro, Plett said, she will receive upwards of $90,000 a year. From the National Bank, she earns $117,000 a year – and she also works for the CBC.

“You do not tell us salaries, you give us a range—her remuneration at CBC is between 274,000 and 519,000 annually, so I have a suspicion it’s upward of 400,000,” said Plett.

“$400,000 working for CBC, I would assume is a full-time job. If she’s making over $200,000 a year doing other work, how can she properly serve the Canadian public by doing her work in the real estate industry and as legal counsel for the CBC?” asked Plett.

To which Lacroix answered, “Women on boards is a key subject matter in this country. Not enough spectacular women make it to boards of directors of important companies. Maryse Bertrand is a really seasoned executive. We were very fortunate — I was very fortunate — to be able to convince her to leave her law practice and join us.”

That answer angered both Plett and Conservative senator Leo Housakos.

Housakos said he was stunned by Lacroix’s answer – and that people expect Lacroix to live by the same high standards set by the CBC.

“You answered the question Senator Plett asked by simply saying that you find it justified that Ms. Bertrand would make $.25 million to $.50 million a year as a senior executive in an important role at CBC/Radio‑Canada, while serving on a bunch of other boards because she’s a qualified woman and you think that’s a positive thing. With all due respect, that’s not acceptable.”

Thursday, October 06, 2016

The CBC threatened to sue NDP

Noah Richler ran for MP as the NDP candidate in the riding of St. Paul’s in the last election. He had great hopes for raising the level of the debate and, even though his opponent was multi-term Liberal incumbent Carolyn Bennett, of winning. He did neither, and his very entertaining new book, The Candidate: Fear And Loathing On The Campaign Trail (Doubleday, $34), recounts why. He talks to NOW about what went wrong.
  • The CBC threatened to sue the party over a satiric video that tweaked sections of Peter Mansbridge’s interview with Stephen Harper. 
The ego of some of the CBC players is unbridled. That’s an issue. And the CBC’s instincts for survival affects editorial decisions. The political interviews The National has put forward are inexcusably bad – the ones with Harper and (Rob) Ford are just not good journalism. My video did go viral, and it was news, but all they could see was that Mansbridge and The National were being made the butt of some comedy.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, October 05, 2016

CBC President Hubert Lacroix caught by auditors

CBC President Hubert Lacroix was caught by auditors over-claiming his expenses more than $30,000 over a 6 year period. Caught red-handed he was embarrassed and paid the money back. Only discovery by auditors convinced him to pay back the money.

CBC reporters now have to turn their sights internally as auditors reveal the same sort of culture of entitlement that snared Senators Pamela Wallin and Mike Duffy recently.

“We’ve been reporting a lot on ineligible expense claims by public officials, now we have a story in our own backyard,” CBC reporter Rosemary Barton reported on Friday.

This story is the tip of the iceberg of the corruption at the heart of Canada’s publicly funded broadcaster. Much like the BBC on which it is modeled, the CBC is hiding its secrets from public scrutiny through deception and lawyers. The CBC spends more than $3 million every year for external lawyers to hide issues like this, along with an extensive internal legal department.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, October 04, 2016

CBC President Hubert Lacroix’s 2020 plan comes under scrutiny

For the last two years as we have struggled to make sense of CBC President Hubert Lacroix’s 2020 plan and his focus on exclusively promoting CBC’s digital presence while gutting television news and programming, and sidelining radio, many of you have urged us to be more outspoken about this sudden and largely unexplained shift in priority that has resulted in an unprecedented number of layoffs, (one in four CMG members have been affected).

Within our own ranks, initially some of my colleagues were reluctant to criticize Lacroix’s vision for various reasons, including a lack of real information. In the intervening months, we have seen an increasing number of media analysts take aim at Lacroix’s 2020 plan, wondering as we have, whether it is an excuse to downsize and cut staff masquerading as an enlightened plan to support digital technology or as a considered attempt at moving the public broadcaster forward.

This issue continues to be crucial as Lacroix is promoting his plan to the new Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly – who worked for him in Montreal in his private practice (mergers & acquisitions specialist), at Stikeman Elliott pre-CBC.

Read the full story here.

Monday, October 03, 2016

CBC Peter Mansbridge's departure is a golden opportunity

Nothing in Peter Mansbridge's three-decade tenure as CBC news anchor so graphically illustrates the problem with television news as his manner of leaving.

In the CBC's official news release, Jennifer McGuire says: "Peter has been paramount to making CBC News the most trusted brand in news in this country."

McGuire's use of the term "brand" gets to the root of the problem.

One of the functions of a good public broadcaster is to experiment, to be creative and take risks in ways commercial media can't or won't. Mansbridge's departure is a golden opportunity for CBC to re-think its news operations and develop new formats more in line with public service less and less defined by the need to make a profit for shareholders.

Read the full story here.

Friday, September 30, 2016

CBC BOD needs new appointment process

A member of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's board of directors has resigned from his position to seek the presidency of the Conservative Party of Canada, The Tyee has learned.

Meanwhile, a CBC watchdog group said Mitchell's move, and the number of other appointees with political ties, show why there is a need for a new board appointment process for the public broadcaster.

The group's spokesman, Ian Morrison, said that while Mitchell did the right thing by stepping down to seek the party presidency, the situation again highlights how the CBC's board can be too easily loaded up with those close to political interests.

Such appointments can cause a problem even after a party is ousted, Morrison said, explaining how the Liberals must now rely on a board appointed by their political enemies to spend a $675-million cash injection to the CBC in coming years.

Morrison said that the Liberals have also done their share of appointing political friends to the CBC board in the past, and argues that many Canadians want change.

Read the full story here..

Thursday, September 29, 2016

CBC needs an adult in charge

As CBC supporters must know by now from bitter experience, you can rely on the public broadcaster. It always lets you down. Always.

Last week’s farcical barring and un-barring of Linden MacIntyre from CBC News Network, where he was due to promote his final fifth estate report, had the air and dynamic of awful workplace panic with an added tincture of spite.

It’s not over, this farce, and it might be getting worse. At this point you have to ask – Is there no adult in charge at CBC?  The childish behaviour has become breathtaking.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

CBC cannot even know what its problems really are

What a cathartic and rejuvenating process the entire Jian Ghomeshi sexual assault scandal has turned out to be, hasn’t it? Admittedly not so much for the victims, who now would seem to number in the dozens, many of them employees at the CBC. Exposed to near daily predations and humiliations of Canada’s most narcissistic public broadcasting star, by all accounts enabled by management, their lives have no doubt been scarred after enduring such a toxic, mortifying workplace.

But putting aside all that unpleasant human devastation, look how positively things have turned out for the CBC and its egotistical, domineering former star. In a statement to staff on Wednesday, the broadcaster’s CEO, Hubert Lacroix and vice-president of “people and culture,” Josée Girard, highlighted how the CBC has grown stronger in the scandal’s wake.

Have a look at the CBC’s own internal investigation, the “Rubin report.”

This is the report, mind you, whose rigorousness was widely doubted, given that it was restricted to probing just two CBC shows, participation was voluntary (and many staff refused), the investigator, Janice Rubin, had a pre-existing relationship with CBC producers, and employees were cautioned not to participate by their union — since executives made it clear their testimonies could be used against them.

Outside the CBC the report has even been called a coverup.

Lacking any real market signals that hold it to account, the CBC might say it’s turned over a new leaf. It might even believe it. But it has no way to know if it’s really fixed its problems. In fact, it cannot even know what its problems really are.

Read the full story in the Financial Post here.

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

CBC president Hubert Lacroix and board must go

A petition among CBC and Radio-Canada employees says president Hubert Lacroix and board of directors “no longer have legitimacy.”

The two unions representing the vast majority of CBC and Radio-Canada employees across the country are calling for president and CEO Hubert Lacroix and the board of directors to step down, citing a lack of confidence in their leadership.

“We concluded that they no longer have legitimacy,” Isabelle Montpetit, president of Syndicat des communications de Radio-Canada, told the Star.

Lacroix, who was reappointed to a second five-year term in 2012, was not made available for an interview. Rémi Racine, chair of the 12-member board, did not return a request for comment.

Read the full story here.

Monday, September 26, 2016

CBC’s Peter Mansbridge is the million-dollar anchor

Ever since the late 80s when he used an offer from one of the American television networks as leverage to replace Knowlton Nash as anchor, Peter Mansbridge has been very adept at influencing CBC news management. The National is now built around his persona.

The National was once the leading newscast in the country, handily beating the competition in raw numbers, but also in breaking news stories. Sadly, its best days are behind it and have been for some years. And, Mr. Mansbridge, with all his awards and honours, has presided over this decline.

It’s been reported, but not confirmed by Mr. Mansbridge or the CBC, that the host of The National is paid over $1 million a year; this at a time when the national broadcaster claims to be cash strapped.

So here’s yet another suggestion. Take the million bucks, hire more reporters and editors, go back to the half-hour format that Canadians clearly prefer, and use a staff announcer, a la Earl Cameron, to read the introductions to the reporter’s stories.

Read the full story here.

Friday, September 23, 2016

CBC Fifth Estate film found at fault

After winning his case in Ontario’s Superior Court, Dr. Leenen said, ‘Four years ago we proposed to settle this law suit for $10,000 and an on-air apology. It was refused…The Fifth Estate persisted and took me through 10 weeks of trial.’

The trial judge awarded very high damages for libel against The Fifth Estate and the CBC as well as individual reporters and producers. The CBC appealed. Ontario’s Court of Appeal disagreed with the CBC, and ruled that Dr. Leenen had been libelled. Finally, the CBC tried to take the case to Canada’s highest court, the Supreme Court of Canada.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Peter Mansbridge presided over CBC decline

In the matter of Peter Mansbridge stepping down from CBC’s The National, this might seem ungracious and harsh, but it’s about bloody time.

Mansbridge has spent 28 years as anchor and chief correspondent for CBC Television’s flagship newscast and that’s a very, very long time for anyone to be in a position of on-air authority in the TV business, a business that has changed so much. The traditional anchor position, which Mansbridge embodies in every scintilla in his on-air persona, is outdated and, essentially, redundant.

We have, in fact, shown too much deference to Mansbridge and his ilk for too long.

Yet, what Mansbridge has presided over is a decline. The National no longer has anything like the impact and audience it once had.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

CBC Peter Mansbridge Secret Liberal Ties

Why did Peter Mansbridge keep his relationship with top Trudeau Liberals a secret?

Like the fact that Mansbridge jetted to Italy to preside over the luxury wedding of Kate Purchase, Justin Trudeau’s director of communications, to Perry Tsergas, another top Liberal operative?

And why was Kate Purchase’s father, Bruce Anderson, allowed to have a seat on Mansbridge’s exclusive “At Issue” TV panel for years — even though he was in an obvious conflict of interest?

What other private dealings does Mansbridge have with the ruling Liberal Party that he hasn’t disclosed?

This is a shocking story.

But it has been virtually ignored by the mainstream media. Imagine their national freak-out if a top CBC journalist had a personal relationship with Stephen Harper’s communications director — and put his father on a CBC panel. What a double-standard!

How can the CBC even pretend to be independent and unbiased now?

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

CBC root problem is inexperienced President and BOD

The long series of ill-formed, unaccountable decisions... makes it clear that an inexperienced, government-appointed president and board of directors is a root problem.

Looking back, it really began in 1992 when CBC TV took a gamble that ignored its most important asset, the public. Then-president Gerard Veilleux and his board of directors moved the flagship national news program from 10 .p.m to 9 p.m. The president claimed preposterously that people were going to bed earlier; research showed that was untrue, and managers thought there were enough internal checks and balances to stop the move to 9 p.m. They were wrong. The change was made and the audience plummeted to new lows.

CBC has announced a new strategy that could equal the 1992 disaster of moving The National. CBC is making Internet services the top priority and CBC TV the lowest.

CBC/'s average moment audience for its Internet services, according to comScore, was about 10,000 people in a recent month. This is a small number considering there are 35 million people in Canada; it is in the realm of niche rather than mass media. It is worth mentioning that CBC Internet services are not start-ups, but have been around for 20 years. An hour can't go by without CBC radio and TV reminding you a dozen times to check out, yet the audience remains minuscule.

CBC viewers, listeners and readers may be engaged in different activities but these numerical differences are huge. Yet CBC is reducing the emphasis on established mass media, radio/TV, and increasing the focus on niche, digital media, which will compete with Internet behemoths like Facebook and YouTube.

The CBC's fateful decision to move the national news and the long series of ill-formed, unaccountable decisions since then, makes it clear that an inexperienced, government-appointed president and board of directors is a root problem. The government's review should address this problem.

Read the full story here.

Monday, September 19, 2016

CBC Peter Mansbridge Exposed

Anyone who enjoys a good fairy tale ought to check out the career of Peter Mansbridge, the CBC’s national news reader, as it draws to a close.

In his younger years, Mansbridge never claimed to be a crack reporter or an astute interviewer. He admits he just followed the money, going from radio reporter to television host, competent in both, excelling in neither.

His usefulness had little to do with talent, but he had a testosterone-induced authority and an emotional remoteness that the times and the media required.

Mansbridge’s parting self-reverence has provoked a wave of discontent and a clear lack of gratitude for his services, especially from journalists who understand the difference between kitchen workers and the maitre d’hotel.

In an ironic twist, Mansbridge now finds himself on the sharp end of serious journalism, exposed as making an obscene amount of money for merely putting his voice to the labours of researchers, writers, editors, producers and technicians. The website Canadaland reports (and Mansbridge has not denied ) his most recent salary is just over $1 million a year, plus perks, earning him three times the salary of the prime minister. As the news business is driven to its knees, his negotiated pension will be $500,000 a year, enough to hire 10 journalists with student loans to pay off.

Read the full story in the Winnipeg Free Press here.

Friday, September 16, 2016

CBC pension plan responds to critics

Debra Alves, the plan’s managing director and CEO, describes the challenges of managing a public sector pension plan in a rough environment.

  • How would you respond to critics of public sector pension plans attacking them as “pension Ponzi schemes”?

  • Will the 10% reduction in the CBC/Radio-Canada budget mean layoffs and, therefore, fewer employees as active contributors to the plan?

  • What is the biggest issue that the pension plan faces?
See the answers here.

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Surpluses in CBC Pension Fund?


The CBC Pensioners National Association is the sole unified voice advocating on your behalf – with the CBC, with government and in the national community of retirees.

  • Thanks to the vigilance and determination of the CBCPNA and its members, we have an agreement with the CBC for sharing surpluses in the Pension Fund – a significant benefit for both today’s pensioners and those who will follow us. There is power in numbers.
  • The CBC recognizes the CBCPNA as the vehicle for appointing pensioners’ representatives to critical corporate committees

See even more here.

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Synchronous Decline of Peter Mansbridge and The CBC

The (Toronto) Star's Rick Salutin wrote a piece entitled CBC’s Peter Mansbridge coulda bin a contender. Somewhat dirgelike in tone, Salutin asserts that Mansbridge just seems to have given up on doing any substantive journalism, contrasting him with the redoubtable Walter Cronkite, who he describes as ... ready to stand up against the state and the flow and was solid as the bronze statue of the American revolutionary minuteman who stood “by the rude bridge that spanned the flood/ His flag to April’s breeze unfurled.”

Mansbridge, on the other hand, has happily gone with the flow — and the pressure. CBC has become numero uno for crime stories, weather coverage (today’s snow), product launches, celebrities and awards gossip. None of this is new, or news, and CBC itself doesn’t contest the point.

Read the full editorial here.

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

CBC Peter Mansbridge $10,000 a week retirement

It will come as a relief to Canadians that Peter Mansbridge won’t need to drive for Uber to make ends meet after he signs off from The National next year.

But we don’t have to wait to find out about Mansbridge’s pension. He did not correct Canadaland when it reported that he will pull down $500,000 a year when he is finally dragged out of the studio. If that indeed is the real figure, it is not a pension, it is looting the public purse, because all of this, the outrageous salary, the unnecessary perks, the pension that is really a cash-for-life lottery win ($10,000 a week) each and every year of his retirement, is paid for by the “cash-strapped” CBC, a.k.a. the government; a.k.a. the taxpayer; a.k.a you and me.

Think about it. Is Mansbridge really worth three times more than the prime minister? Has he really earned a pension three times larger than Stephen Harper’s? Should he really be getting double the salary of his own CEO? These questions loom larger when it is remembered that the audience for the National has dropped like a stone since Mansbridge assumed the chair. Today, Lisa LaFlamme at CTV, without the billion dollar grant, is the market leader with twice the audience of the National.

Read the full story here.

Monday, September 12, 2016

Peter Mansbridge Big Bucks

In the wake of Peter Mansbridge's retirement announcement, a new report suggests the CBC veteran won't be living on cat food.

Canadaland reports that Mansbridge makes a whopping $1.1 million per year and is in line to receive a $500,000 yearly pension. Mansbridge told the website the report contains "utter falsehoods."

Citing internal CBC documents, here's what Canadaland is reporting:

Annual base salary: $832,080.80 Overtime buyout: $122,684.00 Wardrobe: $20,000 Speaking engagements: In the wake of a scandal, CBC mandated its stars could not do pay-for-play speaking engagements. Canadaland reports that Mansbridge squeezed the corp for an extra $400,000 in lieu of the speaking gigs.

When he retires, Mansbridge will once again be allowed to pursue lucrative speaking gigs to top off his CBC pension and any other work he does for the network.

Read the full story here.