Its 2016: what case can be made for the Government to be in the broadcasting business, competing unfairly with the private sector? The CBC receives advertising and cable/satellite fees-fees greater than CTV and Global but this is not enough for the greedy CBC who also receive more than a billion dollars of your tax money. And now the new Trudeau Government has promised at least an additional $150 million dollars a year to this biased, wasteful government broadcaster. As is, Taxpayers continue to be hosed to the tune of about $100,000,000 (yes, 100 MILLION) of our taxes every 30 days with no CBC accountability to taxpayers as they continue with their biased news service serving only the extreme socialists and anti-Semitics. Wake up Canada!

cbcExposed continues to hear from confidential sources inside the CBC about the "scandal du jour" and we will continue to expose their reports of waste, abuse and bias while we protect our sources. We take joy in knowing CBC-HQ visits us daily to research our stories such as the CBC Sunshine List, ongoing scandals including the epic Dr. Leenen case against The Fifth Estate (the largest libel case ever awarded against the media in Canadian history) where no one at CBC was fired and taxpayers paid the award and legal costs for this CBC Libel action. Writers and filmmakers take note-this is a Perfect story for a Documentary!

cbcExposed continues to enjoy substantial visitors coming from Universities and Colleges across Canada who use us for research in debates, exams, etc. We ask students to please join us in this mission; you have the power to make a difference! And so can private broadcasters who we know are hurting from the dwindling Advertising revenue pool and the CBC taking money from that pool while also unfairly getting Tax subsidies money. It's time to stop being silent and start speaking up.

Our cbcExposed Twitter followers and frequent visitors to cbcExposed continue to motivate us to expose CBC’s abuse and waste of tax money as well as exposing their ongoing left wing bully-like news bias. Polls meanwhile show that Canadians favour selling the wasteful government owned media giant and to put our tax money to better use for all Canadians. The Liberals privatized Petro Canada and Air Canada; it’s time for the Trudeau Liberals to privatize the CBC, not give them more tax money.

What does it take for real change at the CBC? You! Our blog now contains a link to the Politicians contact info for you to make your voice heard. Act now and contact your MP, the Cabinet and Prime Minister ... tell them to stop wasting your money, and ... sell the CBC.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Was former CBC Executive fired for political reasons?

A former top executive at CBC is suing the national broadcaster for wrongful dismissal, saying he was “scapegoated” in the wake of the scandal surrounding Jian Ghomeshi.

Todd Spencer, a 45-year-old former executive director of human resources, says the company where he worked for 11 years fired him for “political reasons” after he was involved in an internal investigation into allegations of sexual harassment against former Q radio host Ghomeshi, according to a statement of claim.

Read the full story here.

Monday, July 25, 2016

CBC dealing with employee tension, rage and confusion

CANADALAND has obtained internal CBC documents illustrating how the organization is dealing with employee tension, rage and confusion.

Here is CBC News’ “Digital Mantra”, also titled “CBC Digital Strategy in 3 Slides” (link) Here is management’s attempt to answer questions submitted by employees following last month’s employee town hall (link). The CBC work atmosphere has by all accounts hit a new low since the town hall, where employees hoped to learn whether or not they would be keeping their jobs. Instead, they were forced to endure President Hubert Lacroix’s “Vision 2020” unveiling, a smokescreen of digital futurism bafflegab that obscured the painful truth, that 1500 unspecified positions will be eliminated over the next 5 years. While each employee waits to find out if they’re getting the axe, they are expected to internalize and execute the CBC’s “digital mantra”, which will result in news content designed for phones and tablets, somehow (it has to do with “pillars” and “planks”).

A couple of brave (doomed?) workers actually piped up to demand Lacroix’s resignation for running the whole enterprise into the ground (he refused) and the whole affair was hustled to a premature close as questions were still being hurled at the stage.

Read the full story here.

Friday, July 22, 2016

CBC workplace is psychologically unhealthy

A survey conducted for CBC in the summer by Gallup showed that “pride of association” has plummeted from 92 per cent of employees feeling proud to be CBC journalists and support staff in 2012 to 69 per cent in 2015.

“Psychological health and care for individual well-being are significant concerns,” says a report released internally to CBC and obtained by the Star. The results show 43 per cent of survey respondents said they would not describe their workplace as psychologically healthy. 

Concerns were also raised by survey respondents over whether the CBC deals effectively with “situations that may threaten or harm employees.” Almost a third (29 per cent) said the CBC does not.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, July 21, 2016

CBC Calgary shameless in its assault on Alberta's energy sector

CBC Calgary’s taxpayer funded jihad against Alberta’s energy sector has gone from being merely biased to being grossly misleading.

You can hardly flip on one of their morning newscasts without hearing another grim, hit piece telling Albertans how bad, dirty, dangerous and unpopular their energy sector is.

On Wednesday; in a transparent piece of journalistic malpractice, we are told the results of a survey have found the energy sector may be damaging Calgary’s reputation outside Alberta.

There was nothing balanced, fair or even accurate about it. The CBC dug out whatever anti-energy smear it could of out statistics on Page 20 while it ignored the overwhelming numbers that didn’t support it’s usual anti-oil narrative.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, July 20, 2016

CBC’s legal counsel argued AGAINST free speech

Canada’s state broadcaster has been busy proving themselves to be one of the most devoted enemies of freedom of speech and information sharing in the country.



They were relentless in their effort to maintain control of information for their own purposes even if it meant going against the principle of free speech, copyright law and access to information that they themselves rely on.

See the full story here.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

CBC says Peter Mansbridge makes just $80,000

CBC president Hubert Lacroix insulted and disrespected taxpayers by not fully disclosing the salaries of high-level CBC employees, said senators on a committee studying the public broadcaster's future. 

Lacroix responded to the Senate's committee on transport and communications' request for financial disclosure by submitting 184 pages of base employee salary scales that senators said left out the full take-home income of many of the corporation's big-name personalities.

For instance, Lacroix's submission revealed that the host of CBC's The National, Peter Mansbridge, one of the most famous journalists in Canada, makes roughly $80,000 -- the same as a lower-level reporter.

Read the full story here.

Monday, July 18, 2016

Former senior executive suing CBC

Fired over the Ghomeshi affair, a former senior executive is suing the CBC for more than $640,000, saying he was scapegoated and sacrificed in a face-saving effort by senior management.

Todd Spencer, 45, accuses the national broadcaster of blaming him for the public mess over former star host Jian Ghomeshi. Yet, top management – up to and including CBC president Hubert Lacroix – were “deeply involved with and aware of” the investigation that he and others carried out into allegations against Mr. Ghomeshi, he says.

“The CBC terminated Spencer’s employment for cause for political reasons and has used Spencer as a scapegoat for the Ghomeshi affair,” a legal filing with the Ontario Superior Court of Justice says. “Spencer states that the CBC fired him to send a message to the Canadian public that the CBC takes matters of workplace harassment seriously.”

Read the full story here.

Friday, July 15, 2016

Rein in CBC to protect Canadian journalism

Private industry has to compete with its arms held behind its back

There is trouble in today’s news media industry. Large newspaper chains such as Postmedia have made staff cuts to offset reduced revenues. Newspapers and local TV newsrooms, which often provide communities with their only source of local content, are struggling. An Ontario daily paper recently shut down. Many now wonder what the future of journalism will look like.

A common proposal to reverse this decline is for government to subsidize newspapers, just as government subsidizes CBC to the tune of $1 billion a year. Proponents of the idea say that subsidies would lessen the importance of readers and advertising dollars on the bottom line, and allow local news providers to remain open. Subsidies would surely stabilize an uncertain employment market for print journalists, as it has for CBC.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Few Canadians loyal to CBC

Decades ago CBC was the only Canadian TV or radio station most Canadians could receive. It was a necessity, not a convenience. A handful of private radio stations existed in major cities in the 1920s; but in the 1930s Parliament created the CBC and rapidly it became the most important radio broadcaster in the country.

The 1950s was also a golden age for CBC TV because of its near monopoly of the television audience across the country.

CBC TV finds itself today in a very fragile position, as desperate as radio’s was 50 years ago. Today CBC TV is only one (two if you count its news channel) of hundreds of channels, with less and less to distinguish it from private channels.

CBC airs many of the same programs one finds on private channels: Hollywood movies, NHL hockey, the Olympics, news and information that increasingly mimic the style of private TV, and, until recently, daily U.S. game shows. Most importantly, virtually all the same commercials that are aired on private TV also appear on CBC.

CBC TV does have an audience reach much larger than CBC Radio. About four in five Canadians are regular viewers; but, according to CBC, CBC’s share of total viewing time is now on average about 5 percent. That is a tiny fraction of what it was in the 1960s or even the 1970s and ’80s. There are parts of the day and seasons of the year when the audience share is 3 to 4 percent.

A large number of Canadians find something worth watching occasionally on CBC. But few are loyal to the service. The average Canadian spends only about 70 hours per year watching CBC TV, including NHL hockey and foreign programs. Remove those programs and the number is only about 35 hours per year.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

No accountability at CBC could destroy industry balance

A group of Quebec broadcasters has fired back at CBC/Radio-Canada president and CEO Hubert Lacroix over remarks made during an appearance at the University of British Columbia on Tuesday. 

Groupe Serdy president and CEO Sébastien Arsenault, Groupe V Média president and CEO Maxime Rémillard, and TVA Group president and CEO Julie Tremblay released a joint statement Wednesday saying Lacroix had mischaracterized their position as a desire to keep the public broadcaster locked into the “status quo.”

The executives said they are actually advocating for a “thorough review” of CBC/Radio-Canada’s mandate as part of the review of Canada’s broadcast system announced by the Minister of Canadian Heritage.

The statement argued that if there is “no accountability” for an additional $675 million in government funding CBC/Radio-Canada is slated to receive, the “already precarious balance” between the public broadcaster and the rest of the industry “will be destroyed.”

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Should CBC be more like HBO

The problem the CBC faces is that whatever their motives might be, its antagonists are, on the whole, right (you should pardon the expression). They are right in terms of the immediate controversy, i.e., whether the corporation is obliged to comply with access to information requests, even from its competitors: clearly, under the law, it must. While the law makes exception for certain types of documents, it cannot be up to the CBC alone to decide which documents qualify for this exception, as a court has lately ruled.

And they’re right in their more general proposition: that it is long past time for fundamental reform of the corporation’s mandate and structure. Put simply, the case for a publicly funded television network has collapsed.

Fast-forward five years from now, and it’s quite clear that television will no longer be delivered in the form of separate channels, each streaming a series of programs one after the other. Turn on your TV, rather, and you’ll see a screen full of icons representing the shows you subscribe to: the iTunes model. Indeed, that’s how many people watch TV now.

Put it all together, and there is simply no case for continuing to aim hundreds of millions of dollars every year at a single point on the dial. It’s not good for taxpayers. It’s not good for viewers. And it’s not good for the CBC itself, and the people who work there. The best television, as on HBO, emerges from a partnership between creative producers and a passionate, demanding, discerning audience.

So big change is coming. That much is certain. The question is whether the CBC will get out in front of it, or whether it will drag its heels, hankering after a world that has gone and isn’t coming back. 

Perhaps the present controversy will clinch the case. So long as the CBC is dependent on the public purse, it will always be vulnerable to political pressure and the vagaries of budget cuts. Freed from that dependence, it would be free to chart its own course, accountable neither to advertisers nor to backbenchers, but to those best and wisest of judges, its viewers.

Read the full story here.

Monday, July 11, 2016

Private broadcasters cry foul over CBC plan

Canada’s largest private radio broadcaster has come out swinging against the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s move to start selling advertising on its CBC Radio 2 and Espace Musique stations. 

Astral Media, which is in the process of being sold to telecom giant BCE Inc., said it will oppose the CBC’s application to the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to change its licensing conditions to allow the two secondary CBC stations to begin airing commercials. It will likely get a chance to air its concerns at public hearings later this year.

Read the full story here.

Friday, July 08, 2016

CBC Retracts Claim - Again

CBC Retracts Claim that Jewish Defense League of Canada (JDL) is a Terror Group, Again!

Yesterday, CBC News.ca issued the following retraction (what they called a “clarification”) after our public broadcaster’s news website falsely claimed that the Jewish Defense League of Canada (JDL) was a bona fide terror group:



In a CBC.ca article published yesterday, the following was incorrectly reported: “On the other side of the street, at a counter-protest organized by the Jewish Defence League, protesters waved Canadian and Israeli flags with signs that read “Canadian law, not sharia law” and “Democracy, not terrorism.” Khawaja calls the JDL, which the FBI has labelled a right-wing terrorist group, an “extremist organization.”

As HonestReporting Canada told CBC editors, the Jewish Defence League of Canada is not a listed terror organization here in Canada.

See the full story and on air apology here.

Thursday, July 07, 2016

CBC 5 year accountability plan not clear

Lawyers, lobbyists, artists and various stakeholders are all gearing up for the Trudeau government’s ambitious plan to redraft the laws and policies that govern the country’s $48-billion cultural industries.

Most people found out about the sheer breadth of Ottawa’s strategy when Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly said in The Globe and Mail on April 23 that the system is “broken” and “everything is on the table” in the bid to fix it.

Even before Ms. Joly announced the government’s sweeping review, a big shift was under way at the CBC. The latest federal budget pumps $150-million in extra annual funding into the public broadcaster, in support of its shift to a digital-first mentality.

In return for the cash infusion, the CBC must forge a five-year “accountability plan” with government, but it’s not yet clear – even to those in the CBC’s senior ranks – how that process will dovetail with the wider policy overhaul. Ms. Joly has also been tasked with reviewing the process for CBC board appointments.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, July 06, 2016

What do Canadians want from CBC

Although they are talking of establishing a five-year “accountability plan” for the CBC, the Liberals seem to think the logic of giving the broadcaster more money is self-evident. “Because it’s the CBC,” you can imagine them saying.

But given the revolutionary changes to the media landscape, wouldn’t this be a good time to revisit what we want from public broadcasting, and how best to achieve it, before simply writing a giant cheque?

The CBC is making all the right noises about investing much of the new cash in a digital strategy of some kind. That sounds necessarily futuristic and sensitive to the disruptive nature of today’s communications technology.

Because it’s 2016.

But as someone who works in privately owned media, as a writer, broadcaster and business owner, I find it hard to understand why the CBC uses taxpayers’ money to operate websites that compete directly with every newspaper, magazine and broadcaster in the country. Is the Internet so short on sources of information that we need another one, subsidized by the government?

Rather than modernize the CBC, the government should be updating the way it invests in quality Canadian programming. Without the costs of a broadcast network and various channels and websites, there would be more money to create content and more viewers, readers and revenues for private media companies with which the CBC currently competes.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, July 05, 2016

CBC is a gravy train for elites

News media is undergoing a rapid and beautiful process of creative destruction: digitalization means vastly lower costs, fewer barriers to entry, and a wider variety of competing options for consumers to enjoy. Amid this innovation and weeding out stands the too-big-to-fail albatross, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Already costing taxpayers $1.04 billion in 2015 and facing rising competition, the CBC's fiscal burden is set to jump by $75 million in 2016 and $150 million in 2017. Regarding the higher price tag of the state broadcaster, Finance Minister Bill Morneau has deflected by saying that “believing in innovation is also believing in the talent and in the creativity of Canadians.” Apologists further contend this is necessary to save the CBC from "extinction."

That begs the question: if the CBC is growing obsolete and people favour other sources, ones that do not cost the taxpayer, how is that a bad thing?

The truth is that the CBC has become a gravy train for elites, with the backing of government unions. These elites have managed to persuade people that they are desperate and hard done by, while the average salary at the broadcaster is $100,528 per year. That is well into the top 10 per cent of all Canadian earners and 23 per cent more than the average earnings of a private-sector TV employee, even before the CBC's luxurious benefits.

Read the full story here.

Monday, July 04, 2016

CBC planning to pull away from television and radio

For the second time since the election of Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government last fall, you could hear all employees at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) breathing a big sigh of relief.

The struggling public broadcaster received a reprieve from the new federal government after plans were announced today to provide the network with a $675-million investment over five years. CBC will receive a $75 million boost this year, followed by a $150 million annual increase until 2021.

More than 2,800 positions have been eliminated at the CBC since 2008 due to the Conservative government and changes in the media landscape.

In more recent years, the CBC lost the Canadian rights to cover the NHL in Canada; its once-leading sports department has been completely decimated, it is no longer able capable of broadcasting professional sports.

Its renowned documentary unit also no longer exists as part of the latest round in job cuts. Overall, quality original programming – a key mandate for the public broadcaster – has greatly suffered.

The latest plan indicated the CBC would pull away from television and radio and focus more of its resources on digital and mobile platforms.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, June 30, 2016

CBC In Hot Water Over False Reporting on Peter Nygard

Producers from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation’s (CBC) show, “The Fifth Estate”, are before the courts in Canada accused of knowingly using individuals who were ‘convicted con artists’ and “not credible” to speak ill of fashion mogul Peter Nygard.

The CBC’s Fifth Estate show aired with interview guests making disparaging remarks about Mr. Nygard despite Mr. Nygard’s lawyers sharing evidence with the CBC that these guests were not credible.

Subsequently, a criminal prosecution was launched by Mr. Nygard for defamatory libel against the show’s host and the CBC producers.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Tax subsidized CBC wants to charge viewers

CBC seeks end to over-the-air television

Canada’s public broadcaster said it needs to stop transmitting over the air and be sold to cable and satellite providers like a specialty channel to survive a market being rocked by Internet-delivered TV like Netflix Inc.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corp., which began broadcasting on TV in 1952, said that if it shut down its transmitters, copyright law would allow it to charge a fee to carriers to use its channels instead of relying only on advertising, CBC’s president, Hubert Lacroix, said.

The CBC, founded in 1929, broadcasts from 27 transmitters across the country, 14 in English and 13 in French. The broadcaster garnered 8.4 percent of prime-time viewers on average over the last fiscal year, CBC said in its third quarter report.

CRTC chairman Jean-Pierre Blais asked the CBC how it thought Canadians would respond to the prospect of paying a subscriber fee for content many of them see as “almost a constitutional right.”

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

CBC president Hubert Lacroix "loved" Jian Ghomeshi

The future of the public broadcasting corporation in Canada is in trouble, according to CBC president Hubert Lacroix. He discussed his views of the industry and other recent controversies to Concordia’s Journalism department ...

Lacroix spent most of his presentation polling the audience on whether they watch programs and newscasts from the CBC, and whether the students take advantage of their mobile platforms and services.

Following his presentation, Lacroix addressed the recent controversies surrounding the CBC, including the Jian Ghomeshi and Amanda Lang scandals.

On his relationship with Ghomeshi, the President said he “loved him” and connected him with as many people as he could within the CBC and Radio-Canada. Due to “legal issues,” his comments about the allegations were limited.

As for Amanda Lang, the CBC journalist who provided favourable coverage to two companies who offered her paid speaking engagements, Lacroix said that the CBC is considering the allowance of employees to possibly engage in paid appearances.

Days after his presentation at Concordia, the CBC announced that they would no longer allow their journalists to do any paid speaking appearances.

Read the full story here.

Monday, June 27, 2016

CBC Peter Mansbridge behaviour compared to Jian Ghomeshi

Linden MacIntyre has not been barred from appearing on CBC News Network this week despite an internal public broadcaster memo to the contrary.

Jennifer Harwood, managing editor of CBC News Network, sent a memo late Wednesday stating that any interviews with MacIntyre on the network this week have been cancelled.

The memo said the move came about because of MacIntyre’s recent comments to the Globe and Mail comparing the workplace behaviour of Peter Mansbridge to that of ousted “Q” host Jian Ghomeshi.

Read the full National Post story here.

Friday, June 24, 2016

Timid suggestion for CBC management

As reported by Andrew Mitrovica on iPolitiics, the CBC ombudsman, Esther Enkin, has finally reached her decision on the many conflict of interest complaints lodged against Rex Murphy and Peter Mansbridge.

Briefly, here is what she said:

“Given that Journalistic Standards and Practices spells out a commitment to independence, and the Conflict of Interest guidelines encompass perception of conflict as well, it is inconsistent with policy when CBC news and current affairs staff accept payment from groups that are likely to be in the news.

She has a somewhat timid suggestion for CBC management:

“But since taking money leads to a perception of a conflict of interest, CBC management might want to consider, in the review they are undertaking, whether even with disclosure, it is appropriate for CBC news and current affairs staff to get paid for their speaking engagements.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

CBC CEO Hubert Lacroix broke terms of contract

CBC CEO Hubert Lacroix was already in hiding within the broadcaster, but the Jian Ghomeshi monster has dragged the executive suite into the light once again. Lacroix, the mastermind who lost the NHL broadcast rights and too all of the revenue for CBC, went deeper in hiding since the Ghomeshi affair has taken over the news. Lacroix dispatched Vice President (Of Nothing) Heather Conway to speak on behalf of the executive team.

CEO Hubert Lacroix was found guilty in audits of breaking the terms of his contract and claiming over 40,000.00 dollars housing allowance he was not entitled to, over a 4 year period of abuse. Lacroix is a lawyer, he has never denied breaking the terms of his contract. Lacroix is guilty but remains in his position, juxtaposition Senator Mike Duffy who has not been found guilty of anything yet and has been thoroughly decimated by team CBC.

Why does Hubert Lacroix remain as the CEO of Canadian Broadcasting?

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

CBC is not about Canadian programming

With the CBC’s TV ratings down 40% to a specialty channel-like 5% share of viewers even before it lost its NHL contract, according to Canadian Media Research, it’s worth asking again what has gone wrong with the Mother Corp and what should be done about it?

Someone recently observed that the CBC is not about Canadian programming but programming Canadians to its enlightened view of how the world should work. Look at the litany of in-house CBC stars and ask if any are representative of ordinary Canadians and their values?

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

An exposé of senior CBC managers

Conservative Confidential is a new political memoir that looks at Canada post 9/11. Here are some of the topics in the book: 
  •  The anti-Zionism of the left.
  •  The relationships between the anti-Zionist left and the Islamist movement.
  •  The anti-Israel bias of the CBC.
  •  How the Khomeinists of Iran almost stopped a film in Ottawa.
  •  How Michael Moore flatters Canadians.
  •  How the CBC management couldn't cope with the challenge of explaining 9/11, and why it needs to change.
  •  A new look at Islam and Islamism. 
  •  How the gay establishment succumbed to the worst form of Harper Derangement Syndrome.
  • A new way forward for Canada.
 
From left-wing activist in Montreal and Toronto to Conservative Party campaigner in Ottawa, Fred Litwin tells a captivating coming-out story that will delight and upset right-wingers and progressives alike. There is intrigue with the Iranian embassy, a fiercely critical examination of the gay establishment in Canada, an exposé of the politics driving senior CBC managers, and a behind-the-scenes look at the conservative movement's nasty and shadowy "counter-jihad" subculture. And a lot more.

Check out the website here.

Monday, June 20, 2016

CBC importance to Canadians vastly diminished

I believe that when the CBC began, it was absolutely essential at almost any cost. It was one of the only mediums of communication, and for many parts of Canada it was the only television available. It was undeniably a key means of getting information out from coast-to-coast, and held great cultural value in terms of defining Canada a country. I believe it certainly justified its fairly high cost to the public purse in times past… wait for it… *sound of other shoe dropping*… Unfortunately for the CBC, the world we live in today is not the world of yesteryear.

I believe the current financial commitment in tax dollars to the CBC should be slashed much more dramatically than the current budget suggests (roughly 10%), because its importance to Canadians is vastly diminished relative to even 15 years ago. Imagine what hundreds of millions of dollars could do in terms of plugging the holes in education, health care, or infrastructure? These are the priorities I believe most Canadians have, and the CBC, while a nice luxury to possess, is simply one we can’t afford any more.

Read the full story on the Canadian Finance Blog here.

Friday, June 17, 2016

CBC to be accountable to government

The CBC’s president says the public broadcaster will not use its $675-million windfall from Tuesday’s federal budget to restore what it lost through years of cutbacks, and will instead spend on current priorities such as digital platforms, local news bureaus and original programs.

But the CBC alone may not get to decide all priorities. The government has promised to hammer out a five-year “accountability plan” with the broadcaster. Mr. Lacroix said he has “no details on that,” but he expects to sit down with Mélanie Joly, the Minister of Canadian Heritage, to discuss it before long. 

The CBC has faced calls from some quarters to appoint a new board and management through an independent process, so that appointees could no longer be drawn from a pool of political party supporters. Asked whether the government’s accountability plan could include structural changes to CBC’s management or the way it reports to government, Mr. Lacroix said he has “no idea. We’ve not spoken about that at all.”

Read the full story here.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

CBC and Immigration

Immigration Watch Canada has justifiably lost patience with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC). The CBC has shamelessly appointed itself as the propaganda arm of Canada’s immigration lobby (immigration lawyers, “mass immigration” advocates, and ethnic groups. Every day, it betrays Canada and its majority population. It is a quisling organization and it deserves our contempt.

For the record, we provide below an earlier description of our case against the clear bias in the CBC. That description continues to apply, but the CBC’s behaviour has become much worse.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Opinion - CBC has sunk as low as they can go

It is one thing to compete with your opponents in an election, but when you have to fight your so-called national broadcaster, i.e. the CBC, it gets pretty disgusting.

The Conservatives cut the state broadcaster's budget to $1 billion a year, so I have to assume that’s the reason they have thrown away their journalistic integrity and deliver biased and sanitized news. If governments are to be held hostage by the CBC if they don't give them what they want, we are in big trouble as a nation. This is one more reason why no network should be financed by the taxpayers. All networks should compete on a level playing field.

When we have to listen to CBC pundits, call people names, make snide remarks, speak rudely and interrupt them and they still consider themselves professionals, they have sunk as low as they can go.

Read the full opinion piece here.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

CBC reporter crosses line

From the Office of the CBC Ombudsman:

The complainant, Steve Cherry thought it inappropriate for Neil Macdonald to refer to creationism as superstition in a column he wrote about challenges facing the Republican policy in the face of a Trump candidacy for President. Expressing opinion is prohibited by CBC policy and even this passing reference did not meet the standard.

Lianne Elliott, an Executive Producer with cbcnews.ca responded to your complaint.

Ms. Elliott told you that she realized the turn of phrase was insensitive. I am glad she acknowledged it could have been better. What she less successfully addressed is the issue of a CBC reporter expressing opinion. Mr. Macdonald is a colorful writer who indulges in hyperbole. In this case it crossed a line and it reads, no matter how tangential to the main point he was making, like opinion. I agree it was unnecessary in the context of this piece, but it is there, and it shouldn’t be.

Read the full review here.