CBC continues its arrogant, wasteful operation beginning with the CEO, Hubert Lacroix and working down the chain of command. Waste is as rampant and unrelenting as is their biased news service.

Our Twitter followers and frequent visitors to cbcExposed help us to continue to expose CBC’s abuse and waste of tax money as well as their ongoing left wing news bias. Thank you for your support.

In addition to what private broadcasters such as CTV and Global get from advertising and cable/satellite fees the CBC also receives $100,000,000 of your tax money every 30 days. No need to run an efficient service, you have lots of money and they know how to spend it, what a marriage!

Time for a divorce! Latest Polls clearly indicate that Canadians want a change. They see no need for a Government owned taxpayer funded broadcast service in 2014 and taxpayers clearly choose to privatize the CBC now. The Liberals did this for Petro Canada and Air Canada and despite Union cries both flourish today without taxpayer money.

This privatization can easily be achieved by selling CBC English and CBC French to separate buyers to maximize the ownership management and content to Canadians. New private ownership of the CBC will enhance the future of media in Canada. The billions earned from the sale of the CBC and the taxpayer savings of $100,000,000 every month could be used for health care and education.

cbcExposed continues to hear from confidential sources inside the CBC and we will continue to expose their reports of waste, abuse and bias. Meanwhile you can make a difference by contacting your MP to let her/him know you believe they should act today to privatize the CBC.

Senators unimpressed with CBC

Senators remain unimpressed with the CBC's latest attempt at transparency.

The CBC recently released financial data on its website revealing that four of its employees have salaries of at least $300,000.

Senators say they want more details.

Committee chairman, Conservative Sen. Leo Housakos, told QMI Agency that, in particular, senators want more info on how CBC pays bonuses. He said employees can receive yearly bonuses of up to 40% of their salary.

Read the full story.

CBC and the new reality

But the CBC has always played by different rules. They're insulated from many of the realities of the industry. So we don't buy the complaints that followed the announcements.

Some people would like to entirely blame these woes on their reduced government funding determined in 2012 -- from $1.03 billion to $913 million 2014-2015.

But this ignores the fact that ratings were lower and the entire industry is struggling with the TV ad market.

That near billion-dollar budget doesn't come out of thin air. Taxpayers just faced some tough economic times; Canadians are right to question such budgets.

Perhaps if the CBC privatizes or reinvents itself to be like TVO or PBS they could work with a smaller budget.

But the bottom line is they need to come to grips with reality.

Read the full story.

The CBC unfairly competes ...

It is time to scrap the CBC and sell off its assets to the highest bidder.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation STILL receives more than $1billion dollars of government funding each and every year.

That's right - more than $1 billion public dollars a year goes to supporting a broadcasting corporation whose market share continues to decline. This is not value for taxpayers, and we want to put an end to it.

There is simply no reason for our government to be in the television broadcast business any longer. The CBC unfairly competes with private sector broadcasters for advertising revenue and programming content - and these private broadcasters are already subject to effective Canadian content regulations.

Read more and sign the petition here.

CBC hockey department exists in name only

As part of Rogers’ new $5.2 billion, 12-year deal with the NHL, CBC’s hockey department exists in little more than name only. While the CBC retains Saturday night hockey for the next four years, all editorial and personnel decisions are now the domain of Rogers, as well as responsibility for production. Rogers will even get the money from the ads that run during HNIC on CBC.

For years, HNIC has been a cash cow that helped float many of CBC’s other news and original programming endeavours, with some estimating it was worth $200 million, and up to half of the TV network’s advertising revenue. With ratings that hovered around the 1.7 million mark, it was a juggernaut, regularly the most viewed sporting event of the week.

The domino effects of this are unknown, but the potential loss of $200 million is sure to have an effect on the properties hockey helped paid for. 

CBC has already said that job losses from its hockey department will be part of the fallout of the deal. The bigger question is the effect it will have on the rest of the network.

Read the full story.

CBC: Failure Night In Canada

You thought Barack Obama and his regime’s Obamacare roll-out was his scandal-ridden government’s disaster du jour? Well perhaps. But it only cost around $500 million of taxpayer cash borrowed from the Chinese for that predictably failed rollout. The Canadian state-owned CBC sucks up $1.2 BILLION every year. And after decades, it is apparently continuing to do so mostly for the purpose of failing.

The only show that the state-owned, socialism-reliant CBC has in the top-20 is a hockey game, the broadcast rights for which were bought by the state-owned behemoth, using taxpayer funds, in competition against private citizen-owned broadcasters (taxpayers). That’s right, through the state-owned, taxpayer-funded CBC, the government competes against its own citizens.

Read the full story.

CBC president Hubert Lacroix wants to quadruple dip into your pocket

Be warned -- CBC wants to dip into your wallet to make you pay more.

CBC president Hubert Lacroix, the guy who double-dipped on his expenses to the tune of near $30,000 (which he later repaid), now wants to double, triple or even quadruple dip into your pocket

The local CBC stations that you already pay for with the $1 billion-plus subsidy CBC gets each year should now cost you more on your cable bill.

CBC audiences are shrinking, the state broadcaster is less relevant to Canadians every day. Their answer to that is to take more of your money. If Lacroix can't run a broadcaster that gets a $1 billion handout each year, then maybe he's is in the wrong line of work.

Read the full story.

CBC TV in a fragile position

Today, CBC TV is the service in a fragile position. It’s just one among hundreds of channels, almost indistinguishable from private competitors.

According to CBC, its share of total viewing time is now about 5 per cent. The average Canadian spends just 35 hours a year watching, if you exclude National Hockey League games and foreign programs.

For decades, CBC TV has strived for a mass audience to attract advertising. But its revenue-driven strategy never delivered the mass audience, and ad revenues are less than they were 15 years ago. CBC’s English TV ad revenues for 2012-13 will be less than $225-million.

In 2014-15, without the NHL, ad revenue will fall to barely $100-million. By comparison, CTV gets more than $750-million a year. Global TV gets more than $400-million.

Read the full story.

CBC TV has an audience crisis

CBC’s Audience Crisis: CBC TV Audience is Down 40%, Lowest in History

CBC TV has an audience crisis, according to the most recent data released by CBC. CBC is required by the government to report on its financial and audience performance on a quarterly basis.

The prime time share of CBC TV is reported as 5.3% at the mid-point of the TV season. This is a loss of over 40% compared to the 9.3% share in 2010-11. CBC Television’s share performance fell from the prior year’s results and is trending below target.”

If the share of CBC TV was just over 5% in prime time, it is below 5% on a 24 hour basis; CBC daytime schedules have traditionally performed poorly compared to CBC’s prime time. Making matters worse is that the audience to about half the U.S. TV stations available in Canada are no longer being measured by the ratings company and neither are services such as Netflix or Apple TV, meaning that CBC’s share of all TV viewing is actually lower than the numbers suggest.

There has been some public debate about whether or not CBC is in crisis. The CBC’s latest report confirms that many programs on the main TV service, despite efforts to be more “popular,” have fallen to audience levels not much greater than many specialty channels. Those who deny the crisis fail to realize that Canadians prefer Duck Dynasty to most CBC shows, including the national news. The most important and costly CBC service has an audience crisis and CBC needs to respond to it. Is it time to rethink the role of CBC TV?

Read the full report.

CBC gives away music while cutting jobs

Despite a parliamentary mandate to provide radio and television services to Canadians in exchange for an annual $1.1 billion subsidy, CBC says it will shift more of its resources to web and mobile productions while cutting core services.

By 2020, the CBC could also shed as many as 1,500 jobs through retirement and attrition. The plan also calls for selling off as much as two million square feet of real estate.

While CBC is cutting jobs there is no sign they are cutting other expenses outside of their mandate.

In 2012, CBC launched a free online music-streaming service that competes not only with private radio, but other commercial services offering similar products for a fee.

While the service is free to listeners that doesn't mean it is free to taxpayers. CBC pays royalties for each song it plays.

Read the full story here.

CBC wants to end free tv

CBC seeks end to over-the-air television

Canada’s public broadcaster said it needs to stop transmitting over the air and be sold to cable and satellite providers like a specialty channel to survive a market being rocked by Internet-delivered TV like Netflix Inc.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corp., which began broadcasting on TV in 1952, said that if it shut down its transmitters, copyright law would allow it to charge a fee to carriers to use its channels instead of relying only on advertising, CBC’s president, Hubert Lacroix, said.

CRTC chairman Jean-Pierre Blais asked the CBC how it thought Canadians would respond to the prospect of paying a subscriber fee for content many of them see as “almost a constitutional right.”

Read the full story.

Are YOU ready to pay MORE for CBC?

The heads of CBC/Radio-Canada have told the country’s broadcast regulator that Canadians are ready to pay to get the broadcaster’s content even if many consider it an acquired right.

They told hearings of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission today they are in favour of revamping the business model of traditional television.

They say the current system has become less profitable because of the multiplication of platforms and new players in the market.

Read the full story.

Note ... Canadians already pay more than $1 billion dollars a year to the CBC via their taxes

CRTC points finger at CBC

CRTC points finger at CBC’s funding model for broadcaster’s woes

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation is asking the national regulator for changes that could enrich it by hundreds of millions of dollars a year, saying they are necessary to protect local television.

CBC representatives appeared before a Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission hearing examining the future of television Friday. They brought a long wish list, asking that all cable companies direct an additional 1% of their broadcast revenues to a fund supporting local television created by all networks and arguing that local stations should be allowed to charge cable companies a fee for carrying them.

Read the full story.

CBC wants you to pay

Canada’s public broadcaster says it can no longer afford to offer its television programming for free over the air as its advertising revenue deteriorates, and it wants cable and satellite companies to start paying for its signals.

The notion that CBC’s channels could be restricted only to those with a cable, satellite or Internet subscription raises fundamental questions about a publicly funded broadcaster’s role and the rights of over-the-air viewers, many of whom live in remote areas and have low or fixed incomes.

The CBC earned about $331-million in advertising revenue in 2013, down more than 11 per cent from 2012, and a large part of that revenue will vanish this year after it lost NHL hockey broadcast rights to Rogers Communications Inc.

Read the full story.

Another CBC Unsubstantiated Claim

The report’s headline claimed that a “Hamilton man’s home in Gaza remains destroyed after war with Israel,” while the report itself stated outright that “The Abu Dagga family’s home was destroyed by an Israeli airstrike last month, during the 50-day war that saw the most intense fighting between Gaza militants and Israel’s military.”

What were the circumstances of the attack? (Were terrorists/weapons housed there or nearby)? Who is to say that an errant Hamas rocket or laid explosives didn’t destroy the home? Or, did an Israeli strike on or nearby the home set off a secondary explosion due to weapons housed in the residence and/or the area?

As we told CBC, If we are to assume Israel did strike the house, Israel certainly didn’t do it arbitrarily and may have even warned the occupants to leave their homes as is their standard practice with emails, text messages, leaflets etc.

Due to CBC’s making unsubstantiated allegations and representing them as fact, and as a result of the lack of context and an Israeli perspective not featured in this report, we felt that this report violated CBC standards for its lack of balance and fairness.

Read the full story.

CBC targets local newspapers

CBC is no longer just a radio and TV broadcaster. They are turning themselves into a major media machine ready to take on one and all in the new digital age. And they are using your tax dollars to do it.

The newest target — your local newspaper.

CBC.ca is more than a website, it is a newspaper, magazine and wire service all in one and it is completely free.

Consumers may like getting their news for free, but if things don’t change, then CBC will be the only game in town after they shut down your local newspaper.

Read the full story.

Harassment claims at CBC

CBC loves to ask questions but the state broadcaster’s president Hubert Lacroix has shown once again that he hates taking them.

Lacroix was asked about a release of documents — some 1,454 pages — related to harassment and inappropriate behaviour in just two CBC offices in Ottawa and Toronto.

“Are you sure that you want me to answer this question?” Lacroix sighed at our reporter.

Well, the answer of course is yes, that’s why he was asked. Lacroix then went on to try to explain away the story by answering a completely different question.

What is the nature of the complaints at CBC? Are we talking about inappropriate jokes or sexual harassment?

How much are taxpayers on the hook for when CBC reaches a settlement? That would tell us how serious these issues are.

From April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010, CBC paid out some 30 invoices to investigators and lawyers regarding harassment claims. Why? And what is being paid out now?

Read the full story.

Selling CBC would be Bold but Right

In 1988, Prime Minister Brian Mulroney did what many considered impossible and privatized Air Canada over the objections of those who thought the government needed to own an airline.

 As a frequent flyer of many airlines, I can tell you that Air Canada is a much better airline today.

 The same can be said of Petro-Canada, which was sold beginning in 1990.

The organization learned to operate more efficiently and satisfy customers.

That was a privatization that was started by Mulroney but finally completed by the Liberal government of Paul Martin in 2004.

If Liberals and old Red Tories like Brian Mulroney can privatize government businesses, why can’t Stephen Harper?

Selling CBC would be a bold step but the right one.

It would help taxpayers by removing the $1.1-billion subsidy and it would also take government out of a line of business it has no right to be in.

Read the full story.

CBC story 'takes sides'

We received this letter from a reader and got their permission to share:
___________

I wish the ombudsman to investigate why the following story is a "sting operation" ; 


Federal Conservatives are putting a new twist on an old tactic: spying on political opponents.
They're no longer content to send observers to rival parties' public events, passively monitoring proceedings in hopes of spotting a gaffe that can be exploited.
They're now employing agents provocateur who actively try to instigate a miscue, secretly record it and then leak it to the media.
Liberals, who've been on the receiving end of the ploy twice in the past three months, call the tactic entrapment, unethical and "Nixonian."
And they worry it could lead to the end of candour in federal politics, with wary politicians reduced to mouthing platitudes and reciting carefully scripted talking points.
but this story is not: 


The words "entrapment", 'Nixonian" and "unethical" are not used for the Liberals secretly recording a Conservative and leaking to the CBC. Why, is the secret recording of a Conservative MP, leaked to the CBC by the Liberal Party, not described as  "entrapment", 'Nixonian" and "unethical" ? The CBC printed 729 words on the topic of "sting operations" and quotes 2 Liberal Party MPs and one Conservative Party Spokesperson. Only 298 words are dedicated to Mr Leslie's hateful anti-Israeli comments. 

Why is the CBC printing a story which 'takes sides'? Why is one secret recording of a Liberal attacked as a 'sting operation' , but another story regarding the secret recording of a Conservative, is not ? I wish the ombudsman to investigate and please reply.

many thanks,

Jon

Make CBC responsive and accountable

Brian Lilly quotes Guy Fournier, former chairman of the CBC’s board of directors: “The CBC never excuses itself and never apologizes.”

Think about that for a moment. The state broadcaster that exists on taxpayers’ money ostensibly to serve the Canadian public, is such an arrogant entity unto itself that it can ignore every vestige of decency and fairness, even when it is proven wrong.

Let the CBC fight for its constituency on the free market, raise its own money, either by donations from the public like PBS in the U.S. (even giving tax deductions for contributions, like any registered charity), or by selling ads.

Terminate the CBC’s free ride on taxpayers’ money and its immunity from criticism. Make it responsive and accountable.

Read the full story.

CBC flipped the middle finger

Does anyone actually believe that CBC news reader Peter Mansbridge makes between $63,797.54 and $80,485.22 a year?

Senators may be held in low esteem but they are still parliamentarians and as such vote on the annual $1.1 billion worth of taxpayers' money that CBC siphons off each year to pay Mansbridge much more than $80,485.22 a year.

I could really care less what Mansbridge makes; the principle is that Parliament demanded information on something that they fund and they should have gotten the information. Instead the petulant CBC flipped the middle finger.

CBC wants to demand openness from government while practising secrecy.

Read the full story.

Canadian Olympian slams CBC

Canadian snowboarder Spencer O’Brien is still sad.

But these cries have nothing to do with the tears she shed earlier at the Sochi Games.

Instead, the 26-year-old B.C. native is “sad” because she thinks the CBC isn’t up to snuff.

“It's sad to hear such unknowledgeable people announcing the Olympics,” she posted to Twitter on Tuesday.

Read the full story.

CBC releases incorrect information to the media

The president of CBC published an article in Huffington Post recently asking Canadians for help in deciding CBC's future. Good idea but the plea received modest reader feedback; a few hundred people at most cared enough to comment or like the article.

CBC also launched an unscientific survey on its web site to solicit public input but it has been met with criticism. Is it a sign that CBC has lost the public, that Canadians have stopped believing in and what CBC and its managers say?

CBC claims to be open, transparent and accountable for the $1 billion dollars in taxpayers' money it receives.

CBC releases financial and other data to the media which often leads to inaccurate reports.

CBC has also released incorrect information to the media about the number of staff it has and the number cut in the past few years.

Read the full story.

Declining viewership causing CBC challenges

The head of the CBC is floating the idea of taking a percentage of every cable or satellite bill in Canada as a way to get the state broadcaster more money.

Heritage Minister Shelley Glover’s office threw cold water on the concept.

“The CBC already receives significant taxpayer funds. They can operate within their existing budget,” Marisa Monnin said. “According to the CBC, it is declining viewership that is causing their challenges. It is up to the CBC to provide programming that Canadians actually want to watch.”

Read the full story.

Former CBC Reporter Endorses Canadian Bestseller

As a former National Reporter for CBC Television News, I can confirm Brian Lilley’s book is right on the mark.

We used to call the executive building on Jarvis St. ‘the Kremlin’ for a good reason; the place was full of leftists.

Worst of all was the public affairs department which was completely out of control even 40 years ago.

I recommend this book to anyone who wants to know the truth about this bloated, biased organization.

Franklin Hilliard
(Former National Reporter for CBC Television News)

CBC Reporter Claims Israel Put “Children at Risk for Military Aims”

On August 25, CBC Mideast bureau chief Sasa Petricic issued the following tweet which claimed that in the recent Gaza conflict, Israel put “children at risk for military aims”.

In his tweet, Petricic linked to a New York Times article which has come under scrutiny for being nothing more than Hamas propaganda. The Times article details a Palestinian teenager’s allegations that he was mistreated during five days of detention by Israeli authorities.

As the Times article lacks credibility, on what grounds can CBC reporter Sasa Petricic assert that Israel “put children at risk for military aims”?

Read the full story.

CBC to cut 8 per cent of staff

CBC announced it will cut eight per cent of its staff over the next two years as it grapples with a budget shortfall of $130 million. It also said it will reduce its sport coverage, saying it can no longer compete against private broadcasters with specialty sports channels and multiple media platforms for professional sporting rights.

In English Services, 334 jobs will be cut—234 at the network level and another 100 regionally. News operations will account for 115 of the cuts in English Services and another 38 in sports.

Currently, CBC has 6,994 permanent employees, 859 contract employees and 329 temporary employees, so these cuts represent nearly eight per cent of all its staff. Of those 657 job cuts announced Thursday, 573 will be let go in 2014.

Read the full story.

CBC lacks common sense, decency, transparency

If the employees of CBC/Radio-Canada are so concerned about the loss of jobs, why don’t they propose a 3% cut to their own income, which could save all the 657 jobs at risk?

Why didn’t the union initiate the reopening of the collective agreement since their members are the best-paid of the industry?

Let’s also not forget that CBC’s managers gave themselves over $18 million in bonuses over the last two years and CBC’s president, Hubert Lacroix, had to recently repay $30,000 in expense claims that violated the corporation’s own spending rules.

What CBC/Radio-Canada desperately lacks these days is not public money but common sense, decency, transparency and political neutrality.

Read the full story.

What role should CBC play

The Internet is remaking the media landscape. Google and Facebook have gobbled up the revenue streams that used to go to newspapers and broadcasters ...

But the CBC has problems that go beyond declining ad revenues. In 2012 the Tories cut $115 million from its annual subsidy, reducing it to $1 billion. In November the CBC lost Hockey Night in Canada, which had provided a foamy stream of beer-ad revenue that will never come back.

CBC, in survival mode, must seek revenue where it can, but it’s past time for the government to re-evaluate its mandate and funding level, and figure out what role the CBC should play in the Internet era.

Read the full story.

Canadian Bestseller lays bare the truth about CBC

CBC Exposed, by Brian Lilley, is a book like no other.  It was named as Political Book of the Year and is now a Canadian Bestseller!

This book takes on the holy grail of the Canadian media landscape and lays bare the truth about CBC.

Reckless reporting at the state broadcaster has ruined lives and cost taxpayers millions upon millions in settlement costs yet no one has ever been held to account.

This book does what the consensus media cowards are afraid to do, tell the truth about CBC.

From reporting driven by vendettas to outright biases against conservatives, gun owners, Israel and any other group that doesn't fit their vision of Canada, CBC Exposed is a call to action to rein in this broadcasting giant.

Once you read this book you too will be convinced that the only way to tame the beast is to sell it.

CBC has power to do “fearless journalism"

CBC personalities including Peter Mansbridge, David Suzuki and Linden MacIntyre are speaking out against a CBC proposal to shut down in-house production of documentaries at the public broadcaster.

Some 75% of CBC documentaries are already produced by independent filmmakers. According to the petition, overall production of documentaries has already fallen dramatically in recent years.

MacIntyre, a veteran host of The Fifth Estate, said independent producers cannot take as many risks because of legal liability and financial pressures. An institution like the CBC has more power to do “fearless journalism,” he said.

Read the full story.