It's 2018 and cbcExposed continues to hear from confidential sources inside the CBC about CBC management snooping on its employees, company waste, low employee morale, huge salaries and benefits for the President and other senior management, gender bias and other scandals and we will continue to expose their reports on our blog while we protect our sources. We take joy in knowing that the CBC-HQ visits us daily to spy on us and read our stories such as news bias, waste, the CBC Sunshine List, ongoing scandals including the epic Dr. Leenen case against The Fifth Estate (the largest libel legal case ever awarded against the media in Canadian history) where no one at CBC was fired and taxpayers paid the award and legal costs for this CBC Libel action. Writers and filmmakers take note-this is a Perfect story for an award winning Documentary!

cbcExposed continues to enjoy substantial visitors coming from Universities and Colleges across Canada who use us for research in debates, exams, etc.

We ask students to please join with us in this mission; you have the power to make a difference! And so can private broadcasters who we know are hurting from the dwindling Advertising revenue pool and the CBC taking money from that pool while also unfairly getting Tax subsidies money. It's time to stop being silent and start speaking up Bell Media-CTV, Shaw-Global, Rogers, etc.

Our cbcExposed Twitter followers and frequent visitors to cbcExposed continue to motivate us to expose CBC’s abuse and waste of tax money as well as exposing their ongoing left wing bully-like news bias. Polls meanwhile show that Canadians favour selling the wasteful government owned media giant and to put our tax money to better use for all Canadians. The Liberals privatized Petro Canada and Air Canada; it’s time for the Trudeau Liberals to privatize the CBC- certainly not give them more of our tax money-enough is enough!

The CBC network’s ratings continue to plummet while their costs and our tax- payer subsidies continue to go up! In 2018 what case can be made for the Government to be in the broadcasting business, competing unfairly with the private sector? The CBC receives advertising and cable/satellite fees-fees greater than CTV and Global but this is not enough for the greedy CBC who also receive more than a billion dollars of your tax money every year. That’s about $100,000,000 (yes, 100 MILLION) of our taxes every 30 days with no CBC accountability to taxpayers as they continue with their biased news service serving only the extreme socialists and anti-Semitics. Wake up Canada!

What does it take for real change at the CBC? YOU! Our blog now contains a link to the Politicians contact info for you to make your voice heard. Act now and contact your MP, the Cabinet and Prime Minister ... tell them to stop wasting your money, and ... sell the CBC.

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Many reasons the CBC could be defunded ...

In private sector broadcasting, where we are paid by great advertisers who we must attract and keep, many of us look askance at the CBC, and why not?

The state-funded broadcaster starts the race every year coming out of the blocks $1.2 billion ahead, thanks to a taxpayer subsidy.

As a one-time “Ceeb” aficionado decades ago, I can attest that no political party in Canada will ever have the courage to cut the CBC’s lucrative lifeline.

There are many reasons the CBC could be defunded, not the least of which is its policy origins; a nation defining and building enterprise, both culturally — staving off the intrusive influence of America — and technically, by providing a pan-national network of transmitters bringing news, sports and entertainment to every corner of a vast Canada.

Read the full story here.

Monday, October 30, 2017

CBC has strayed a long way from its original purpose

The online success of the CBC should be laudable. Its website received an average of 6.2-million unique visitors last year, making it the most popular Canadian website.

In doing so, the CBC has strayed a long way from its original purpose: to sustain Canadian culture when and where the market cannot. The problem is, the CBC’s traditional funding model now allows it to build its digital empire unfettered by economic reality. In its last quarter, 60% of the company’s expenses were paid by government subsidies while just 21% of its revenue comes from advertising. All media companies are struggling to adapt to shifting consumer and advertising patterns brought about by the digital age; only the CBC had $1.2 billion in government cash to fund its experiments and ease the transition.

Read the full story here.

Friday, October 27, 2017

CBC's Downward Spiral

Looking back, it really began in 1992 when CBC TV took a gamble that ignored its most important asset, the public. Then-president Gerard Veilleux and his board of directors moved the flagship national news program from 10 .p.m to 9 p.m. The president claimed preposterously that people were going to bed earlier; research showed that was untrue, and managers thought there were enough internal checks and balances to stop the move to 9 p.m. They were wrong. The change was made and the audience plummeted to new lows.

Flash forward to this century. Government-appointed CBC presidents, the latest being Hubert Lacroix and his CBC board of directors, have made or been induced by managers into: making massive cuts to the CBC Radio budget, ignoring basic radio programming strategy; introducing ads on Radio 2 only to have the CRTC order them to stop; cutting local TV news programs, then expanding them, then cutting them again; turning off TV transmitters in cities smaller than 200,000 people; bidding for unprofitable Olympic rights; launching radio "stations" only available on the Internet; launching a streaming music service with zero revenue in five years; competing for newspaper readers, ignoring it is the Canadian "Broadcasting" Corporation; announcing that CBC will double revenues from digital services, which were almost zero to begin with; watching TV ad revenues in 2015 plummet to their lowest level in history; setting a goal to double the monthly audience reach of CBC Internet services (CBC.ca), ignoring the fact that CBC TV already had a daily reach exceeding CBC.ca.

The past decade has seen a cornucopia of management incompetence.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, October 26, 2017

CBC's astounding about-face

Things that make you go hmmmmm ....
___________________________________________

"We recommend removing advertising from CBC/Radio-Canada," the public broadcaster said in a news release. "This would allow the broadcaster to focus squarely on the cultural impact of our mandate. It would also free up advertising revenue to help private media companies transition to a digital environment."

Okay. Now stop and think about this fact: the first paragraph did not come from me; it came from a news release issued by the CBC in 2011.

Yes, the same CBC now arguing it should be free of ads once said — just five years ago — there was no good reason to eliminate advertising.

"The elimination of advertising revenues would seriously compromise the Corporation’s ability to fulfill its mandate," CBC President Hubert Lacroix said at the time.

I can’t take credit for noticing this somewhat astounding about-face. It took Ken Goldstein, a Winnipeg media consultant with an eagle eye and encyclopedic knowledge of the Canadian media industry, to pick up on it.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Public Policy Forum report calls for CBC to stop selling digital ads

A public-policy group has issued 12 recommendations to revive the Canadian news industry, including cutting off digital revenue to the public broadcaster.

The report by the Public Policy Forum maintains that the decline of traditional media, audience fragmentation, and fake news are undermining faith in Canadian democracy.

"Free cbc.ca of the need to 'attract eyeballs' for digital advertising, which can run contrary to its civic-function mission and draw it into a 'clickbait' mentality," the report states.

As things stand now, the CBC generates about $25 million in annual digital revenue, according to the report.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

CBC Radio providing trivial entertainment ...

I’m not surprised that many of my friends have abandoned CBC Radio. From what I can tell, traditional listeners are leaving in droves.

A friend of mine who’s also a former CBC producer tells me he used to listen to CBC Radio all day. “Now,” he says, “I listen very little. The personal storytelling and victimhood are irritating and are in much of the schedule.”

Critical thought and analysis is limited to non-existent in these programs.

With the CBC strapped for resources, Radio One is sinking a whack of cash into these shows, which instead could be used to add programs that explore major thematic issues week after week. It’s practically criminal that CBC Radio does not have a program on the climate-change crisis.

So why are we getting this strange hybrid of programming at CBC Radio?

An insider tells me: “Over the years, management, at least on the English side, has devalued ‘intellectual’ content. They think it’s boring, high-minded, ivory-tower stuff. They want ‘stories’ — compelling if well-told, and cheap to do. The mantra at CBC Radio is, ‘Tell us your story.’”

The insider says the CBC’s commitment to a strong digital presence and online audience is one of the reasons behind the interest in storytelling above all else. It’s proud of the success of podcast Someone Knows Something, an engrossing and entertaining program that looks into unsolved crimes.

CBC Radio is fixated on building an audience by providing trivial entertainment. For many managers, numbers are more important than content.

Read the full story here.

Monday, October 23, 2017

CBC Radio has lately begun competing with private stations

Curiously, CBC Radio has lately begun competing with private stations, employing pop music on its second radio network and a journalistic style that is starting to sound like private radio. Commercials have even crept in.

Why? One explanation is that CBC has made disproportionate budget cuts to radio, weakening the service and prompting some unsavoury changes. More than $50-million has been lost from radio’s annual budget, which in net terms has been given to CBC TV.

Today, CBC TV is the service in a fragile position. It’s just one among hundreds of channels, almost indistinguishable from private competitors.

It airs many of the same programs you find on private channels: Hollywood movies, pro hockey, the Olympics, news that increasingly mimics the style of private TV – and, until recently, American game shows. Most importantly, virtually all the commercials aired on private TV also appear on CBC.

In 2014-15, without the NHL, ad revenue will fall to barely $100-million. By comparison, CTV gets more than $750-million a year. Global TV gets more than $400-million.

Read the full story here.

Friday, October 20, 2017

CBC President Hubert Lacroix defends corporation’s ability to sell advertising

Foreign news aggregators could end up being subject to Canadian taxes and the CBC may be told it can’t have digital advertising if the recommendations made in a committee report to Parliament on how to save Canadian media are acted on.

It said the Canadian newspaper industry has lost 164 newspapers in recent years. At the same time digital advertising revenues shot up from $560 million to 4.6 billion over a 10-year period.

A number of those who testified before the committee said the CBC’s ability to sell advertising on its website created insurmountable competition for private news outlets.

Globe and Mail publisher Phillip Crawley said the Crown corporation is his newspaper’s largest competitor. Eight other media outlets made similar complaints to the committee.

In a letter to the committee included in the report, CBC President and CEO Hubert Lacroix defended the corporation’s ability to sell advertising on its website.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

How long until CBC is the only game in town?

It is, as far as the eye can survey, a media universe ruled by Google, Facebook, Twitter — and in Canada, the CBC.

The first has an effective monopoly on Internet searches, capturing the associated ad revenue. The second has an effective monopoly on community engagement, endearing photos of our children and, increasingly, display advertising in markets large and small. The third has an effective monopoly on political chatter and breaking news. The fourth announced last week it is setting up an op-ed division.

That said, the Mother Corp. receives $1 billion annually in federal subsidy. Its funding is waxing, courtesy of the Trudeau government. It aggressively sells advertising – indeed, stomps with gigantic feet all over the national ad market, in competition with industry.

How long, given these enormous structural advantages, until the CBC is the only game in town? And how healthy will that be for Canadian democracy, and taxpayers?

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

CBC has strayed a long way from its original purpose

Kirstine Stewart switched in April from running the CBC’s English service to leading Twitter Canada. Plenty of self-styled media critics interpreted Stewart’s move as a high-profile defection from stagnant traditional media to a shiny digital upstart. That assessment is not just wrong, it’s backward: Twitter hired Stewart specifically to court established, traditional media outlets because it wants to establish paid partnerships with content producers; meanwhile, CBC is a dominant digital player in Canada, competing hard—and successfully—against private news, music streaming, and video-on-demand providers.

The online success of the CBC should be laudable. Its website received an average of 6.2-million unique visitors last year, making it the most popular Canadian website. Around 4.3-million people visit the CBC News site each month, besting both The Globe and Mail and Huffington Post.

In doing so, the CBC has strayed a long way from its original purpose: to sustain Canadian culture when and where the market cannot. The problem is, the CBC’s traditional funding model now allows it to build its digital empire unfettered by economic reality.

There is no clear solution to this dilemma, particularly if you see value in a public broadcaster— but not publicly funded Top 40 radio, publicly funded local blogs, or, for that matter, publicly funded newspapers. As its digital footprint has grown, the CBC has effectively become all of these things. It amounts to unintended government-funded intervention where it is either unneeded or destructive.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

CBC caught deceiving Canadians on viewership numbers?

Reviewing my copy of the weekend Globe and Mail revealed this rather stultifying article about the state-run CBC, in which it is shown that the state-run media may be, oh, let’s say “spinning” its viewership numbers to make it appear to Canadians like it’s succeeding in attracting viewers with its fabulous programs. (At taxpayer expense, in competition against private citizen-owned broadcasters…)

Remembering that the state-run and state-owned CBC is by definition a “Crown corporation”, with its president and board members appointed directly by the government and the Prime Minister himself, this is rather important. Deceit or “spin” is not acceptable.

Read the full story here.

Monday, October 16, 2017

More questions than answers at CBC

Hockey, politeness, quaffing Tim’s, and a smug sense of multiculturalism. This list of beloved and familiar national pastimes should be updated to include issuing opinions on the future CBC, on how it should update itself to remain a current and viable national public broadcaster and how, in essence, it can live up to “Canada Lives Here.” The national discussion on the future of the CBC has been reawakened with renewed fervour this year, in light of a new federal government and promises of increased funding in a faltering media landscape.

At the heart of this debate is the digital platform and its inevitable association with youth who, accurately or not, are seen as its natural occupants and, therefore, must be pandered to in order to achieve success on the Internet. At odds with the CBC’s current key audience demographics, which skew heavily towards the latter end of 25 to 55 years of age, a focus on creating content intended for young people could backfire and place it in the realm of legacy media who foolishly rush in to engage with new technology, not realizing it’s already outdated by the time they get there; the Toronto Star’s awkward venture into a tablet version of the paper exemplifies this.

Exactly how the CBC can most effectively bring its core qualities to the digital sphere is a question that has yet to find compelling answers.

Read the full story here.

Friday, October 13, 2017

The problem the CBC faces ...

The problem the CBC faces is that whatever their motives might be, its antagonists are, on the whole, right (you should pardon the expression). They are right in terms of the immediate controversy, i.e., whether the corporation is obliged to comply with access to information requests, even from its competitors: clearly, under the law, it must. While the law makes exception for certain types of documents, it cannot be up to the CBC alone to decide which documents qualify for this exception, as a court has lately ruled.

And they’re right in their more general proposition: that it is long past time for fundamental reform of the corporation’s mandate and structure. Put simply, the case for a publicly funded television network has collapsed. It has done so under the weight of three inescapable realities.

The first is the CBC’s own woeful performance, at least when it comes to English TV.

The second is that the conditions that once justified public funding are no longer present.

This is the third point: network television, of any kind, is doomed.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, October 12, 2017

CBC revenues include Parliamentary appropriations

The six largest television broadcasters accounted for 86% of the sector’s total industry revenues in 2015. In the determination of the top 5 companies, Shaw and Corus were counted as one entity.

The “percentage of total revenue” calculation is based on total revenues reported for each service controlled by the broadcaster. Control was determined where the broadcaster had greater than 50% direct and indirect voting interest as of 31 August 2015.

CBC revenues include advertising, subscriber, and other commercial revenues and Parliamentary appropriations.

See the complete report here.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

CBC TV finds itself today in a very fragile position ...

Decades ago CBC was the only Canadian TV or radio station most Canadians could receive. It was a necessity, not a convenience. A handful of private radio stations existed in major cities in the 1920s; but in the 1930s Parliament created the CBC and rapidly it became the most important radio broadcaster in the country.

By the late 1950s CBC Radio began suffering audience losses, as private popular music stations were launched. Rock ’n’ roll, aided by the invention of the transistor radio and car radios (as well as TV), crushed CBC’s comedy and variety programs. By the late 1960s the audience numbers had so deteriorated that CBC even considered shutting down its radio services.

CBC TV finds itself today in a very fragile position, as desperate as radio’s was 50 years ago. Today CBC TV is only one (two if you count its news channel) of hundreds of channels, with less and less to distinguish it from private channels.

While chasing elusive ratings, CBC TV and, to a lesser extent, CBC Radio have been distancing themselves from the basic principles of public broadcasting. For example, CBC TV and Radio have journalistic policies dealing with the expression of opinion. The policy states: “CBC journalists do not express their own personal opinion because it affects the perception of impartiality and could affect an open and honest exploration of an issue.”

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

The CBC should make a TV drama about the CBC

The Broadcasting Act, which guides the CBC, was last amended in 1991. This means the CBC mandate was forged in a year when Brian Mulroney was prime minister, the GST was introduced and the average Canadian surfed about 20 channels.

There were no DVDs, PVRs, on-demand video, satellite radio, content streams, smartphones, tablets, Apple TV, YouTube, Pandora, Netflix, Amazon or even the Internet as we know it.

As technology reshaped media, CBC TV has tried to be all things to all Canadians.

And it has failed.

Read the full story here.

Friday, October 06, 2017

CBC has lost reams of reach, respect and relevance

The CBC, as useful as it once was, needs a long, hard look. We may have outgrown Mother Corp?

In recent years, the tax-guzzling network has lost reams of reach, respect and relevance.

Worse, it has now betrayed its puffed-up claim to be the country’s conscience and moral compass.

You can’t be sanctimonious after you dismiss years of dark rumours about your radio golden boy, allegations of sexual violence, until they bite you in the ass.

As a Watergate veteran might wonder: What did the CBC know and when did it know it?

Read the full story here.

Thursday, October 05, 2017

CBC TV has an audience crisis

CBC TV has an audience crisis, according to the most recent data released by CBC. CBC is required by the government to report on its financial and audience performance on a quarterly basis. Quarterly reporting began in 2011-12. Reports are issued for the first three quarters of the year and the annual report presents results for the full year.

The metrics CBC uses to measure performance run the gamut from content percentages to revenues obtained from advertising and other sources. To measure audience performance CBC uses audience ‘share’, ‘listening/viewing hours’, ‘average minute audience’, ‘subscriber counts’, ‘unique visitors’ and opinion scores. One needs to be an expert in audience measurement to work their way through this maze of information. I doubt that many CBC Board members or senior managers understand or could explain it all.

There has been some public debate about whether or not CBC is in crisis. The CBC’s latest report confirms that many programs on the main TV service, despite efforts to be more “popular,” have fallen to audience levels not much greater than many specialty channels. Those who deny the crisis fail to realize that Canadians prefer Duck Dynasty to most CBC shows, including the national news. The most important and costly CBC service has an audience crisis and CBC needs to respond to it. Is it time to rethink the role of CBC TV?

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, October 04, 2017

CBC for the cats ...

Interesting tweet we found from "Stats Canada" ... just for a giggle!

83% of CBC's viewership comes from people leaving the TV on for their cats during the day.

See the tweet and see what people are saying here.

Tuesday, October 03, 2017

Are CBC managers deceitful about audience performance?

CBC is like a crazy, old aunt, unwilling to accept the reality of her circumstances. In CBC's case it is the reality that its radio audience is comprised mostly of older Canadians. CBC senior managers have recently boasted about the record high audiences of CBC Radio.

While CBC Radio is undoubtedly the jewel in CBC's crown and virtually a necessity for a large number of Canadians, managers have been close to deceitful about its audience performance.

Yes, the CBC share has grown since 2000 but the base for the calculation of share, hours spent listening, is down by as much as 40 per cent. The CBC share has increased because many non-CBC listeners have abandoned radio for other music alternatives, while CBC's mostly older, beleaguered listeners have stayed with CBC despite the diminished service. In effect, CBC has a larger share of a much smaller pie.

Read the full story here.

Monday, October 02, 2017

CBC almost utterly ignored by most Canadians

This is the Canadian (english-language) viewership ranked from number 1 to 30 for the week of November 14 to November 20, 2016.
1 BIG BANG THEORY – CTV
2 BULL – Global
3 NCIS – Global
4 SURV:MILLEN VS GEN X – Global
4 DESIGNATED SURVIVOR – CTV
6 CRIMINAL MINDS – CTV
7 LUCIFER – CTV
8 GREY’S ANATOMY – CTV
9 HAWAII FIVE-O – Global
10 HNIC PRIME EAST – CBC
11 NCIS: LOS ANGELES – Global
12 THIS IS US – CTV
13 CTV EVENING NEWS – CTV
14 MACGYVER – Global
15 AMER. MUSIC AWARDS – CTV
16 BLUE BLOODS – CTV
17 MURDOCH MYSTERIES – CBC
18 CHICAGO PD – Global
19 THE FLASH – CTV
20 CHICAGO FIRE – Global
21 MADAM SECRETARY – Global
22 BLINDSPOT – CTV
23 CONVICTION – CTV
24 TIMELESS – Global
25 HOW TO GET AWAY/MURD – CTV
26 CTV EVENING NEWS WKD – CTV
27 GOTHAM – CTV
28 BIG BANG THEORY(RERUNS) – CTV
29 DAVID BLAINE – CTV
30 CFL PLAYOFFS – TSN+
As you can see, the state-owned media is almost utterly ignored by most Canadians. Just why it is that so many Canadians insist on paying for it anyway — is beyond me. Logic flies out the window on this one.
The CBC pops up on line number 10 but it’s a hockey game. You can make your own mind up as to whether we need to provide $1.5 BILLION per year to the state-owned CBC in order to broadcast hockey games. Others can do it just as well or better I think.
Read the full story here.